“Hardcore Barefooter”

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I typed in “Hardcore barefooter” just to see what would come up in a Google search… I found this old forgotten picture of my feet (it was the very first pic in the search) on someone else’s Tumblr feed with this accompanying quote: “Now this is HARDCORE BAREFOOTER FEET! When you wear this much jewelry on your feet, there is no need for shoes. Man I’m slackinnn”

And here’s the pic. For those of you foot freaks out there who were wondering who those feet belonged to… wonder no more, they belong solely (get it “Solely”) to me… Barefoot Justine!

Who is this mystery "Hardcore barefooter?" It's me...(Barefoot) Justine Mara Andersen.

Who is this mystery “Hardcore barefooter?” It’s me…(Barefoot) Justine Mara Andersen.

By the way, in the ensuing years… I have lost every single one of those toe rings… and I really miss a couple of ‘em!

OK, it’s all coming back to me now… I was traveling then, sans shoes, and working events, long days, my feet used to get positively grubby. Dig that rainbow Band-Aid! I had Band-Aids on both big toes. It was HOT, August, and the blacktop had actually blistered the bottoms of my toes. No regrets, just bandage ‘em up and keep ‘em movin’!

8 responses »

  1. Love you foot dress. Wearing even flip flops would detract from the artistic adornments decorating your natural feet.

  2. Blisters occur when the air temperature is closer to 100 degrees F, when the asphalt is hotter than 140 degrees F, until the feet are used to that much heat during the hottest midafternoon peak heat hours. (It’s useful to have a small pocket size infrared thermometer–take a reading of the hottest blacktop asphalt to be walked on to assess how hot it will be to stand for longer and to walk on for longer.)

    As long as third degree burns are not occurring (that can cause serious skin damage), the blisters are an expected part of getting the soles used to intense heat when walking, especially during mid-afternoon peak heat. Toe pads and balls of the feet both burn the most intensely, and you already know that when you mention you blistered your toes. Make sure to drain them before continuing going barefoot. (I carry a small pocket size barefoot first aid kit that has a couple of sewing needles for draining blisters and a few band-aids mostly if I get a cut.) Be prepared to re-drain them if needed, and stay away from sandy areas to avoid getting sand in the blisters.

    Even more challenging is standing, as you probably also know. Needing to alternate which foot is cooling off in the air while the other is burning, having to stand on the edges of the feet and roll on the feet (from the edges, to the balls of the feet, to the edges again, to the heels…) when it’s too hot even to alternate feet in the air. But the longer it’s possible to stand with the foot fully on the ground, the more heat tolerant the feet definitely become. Standing for longer also helps when walking–that intense burning tingling building up more when standing actually goes away somewhat when walking.

    Heatfooting is absolutely barefooting at its best! Toughening by hotter and hotter progressive burning, standing and walking on the hottest asphalt for a long as possible before absolutely needing cooler sidewalk or shade. Getting past that heat tolerant limit even if the feet blister. Blisters that reattach become awesome more heat tolerant calluses, blisters that heal and peel away still have more heat tolerant skin where the blister used to be. White calluses showing through blackened dirty soles that still remain gray from baked on dirt after cleaning the feet really show a hardcore toughened sole–whether or not others are actually into feet, the tough sole still shows a hardcore barefooter. Clean tops of the feet do look better than dirty tops of the feet, however.

    • Again thanks for your lengthy responses. As for being barefoot on hot surfaces, I don’t take any special pleasure in it. I was, for some odd reason, much more invigorated by winter snow and ice. Horses for courses, I guess.

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